bye bye, mon amour

bye bye, mon amour


i. home ii. message iii. boom ©
thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

sarcasticmisanthropicvegan:

they were rescued from a testing lab, they’ve never walked on grass before

nuclearharvest:

by Ashkan Honarvar 2014

nuclearharvest:

by Ashkan Honarvar 2014

ana-milya:

Kirovsk / Кировск (Russia) - Flats and Lake by Danielzolli on Flickr.

ana-milya:

Kirovsk / Кировск (Russia) - Flats and Lake by Danielzolli on Flickr.

tagged:  x  

halinacrown:

Hannibal Art Meme

Andrew Wyeth (American, 1917-2009) - revisited
Wyeth remained a polarizing figure even as the traditional 20th century distinction between abstraction and avant-gardism on the one hand and realism and conservatism on the other came to seem woefully inadequate and false. The only indisputable truth was that his art existed within a diverse American context that encompassed illustrators like his father, N.C. Wyeth and Norman Rockwell, and also landscape painters like John Marin, Winslow Homer, Albert Bierstadt and Fitz Hugh Lane. (x) (x) (x) (x)
tagged:  art  

andrewinfante:

John Ford on set of The Searchers

farleysgranger:

Happy Birthday to José Ramón Gil Samaniego, loved by the world as

Ramon Novarro (February 6, 1899 — October 30, 1968)

"He is the ‘star of stars.’ He seems to be blest of the gods, a real man and a perfect gentleman. He is not only artistic and talented in his acting, but he doesn’t mind working hard to obtain the best results. He is the personification of youth, vigor and strength, and is handsome enough in face and form to be a god of old… Ramon is perfect." — fan letter to Photoplay, February 1927

In the hundred-odd years of American movies, few actors have achieved the sort of creative distinction, industry goodwill and immense international popularity that was, for a time, the apparent birthright of a pious would-be opera singer whose film persona came to shape the illusions and ideals of an entire generation. Romantic, religious, intoxicatingly beautiful—Ramon Novarro was a “picturesque” figure, as one critic put it, classical, timeless, quite at odds with the frenzied martini-swilling moderns populating the popular consciousness in an era of loose ankles and rolled stockings. He was like a centuries-old church bell heralding by omission the dawn of flaming youth. Each transformation was marked by childlike enthusiasm and almost priestly solemnity, a combination of sophistication and sincerity totally unprecedented in the annals of screen stardom. It was that same duality of the soul that enabled him to embody effortlessly a spectrum of pilots, pirates and make-believe princes, hell-bent on revenge or awestruck by love, and that fostered the demons which eventually overcame him. If there was ever a star’s life worth celebrating, it would be his—the public journey of a private man, kind, troubled, and very lonely, adrift at the top of the world, whose heartbreak ultimately could not be balmed by the box office but who nonetheless left behind a slew of performances which, for their candor, simplicity, and incomparable warmth, will never be rivaled.

One anecdote illustrates how a set of words, oft-employed and oft-abused, when applied to Novarro are inarguably true: there was no one else like him. In February 1962, thirty-five years after the fan letter quoted above was published, Novarro was arrested for drunk driving. He allegedly told police, “I am old, and I just want to die.” Soon after the statement was disseminated by the media, the great lover-imp of the silent days, who had not starred in a major Hollywood film since 1935, began receiving well-wishes from moviegoers across continents, countries, cultures, strangers united by a fondness for one of the aging shadow-dreams who reigned before the screen could speak. As one fan wrote to her half-forgotten idol, who would be dead before the decade was through, “If you still decide you want to die, please call me, reversing the charges, and sing ‘Pagan Love Song’ once more to me.”

sagaston:

bornofanatombomb:

Boots by Alex Steshak of Homeless Bros.

Reblogging again for the source.

sagaston:

bornofanatombomb:

Boots by Alex Steshak of Homeless Bros.

Reblogging again for the source.

tagged:  fashion